• Views 333
  • Favorites
Photo by Zen Chung via Pexels

Authors

MOOSE, Maine Deptartment of Energy

Grades

3rd, 4th, 5th

Subjects

Science, Social Studies, English Language Arts, Mathematics

Resource Types

  • Lesson Plans
  • Presentation Slides
  • Activity - Classroom
  • Videos, 3 hours, 32 minutes, 4 seconds
  • Videos, 7 minutes, 35 seconds, CC, Subtitles
  • Videos, 3 minutes, 6 seconds
  • Games
  • Activity - Outdoors
  • Worksheets
  • Charts, Graphs, and Tables
  • Articles and Websites
  • Videos, 1 minutes, 56 seconds, CC, Subtitles
  • Videos, 2 minutes, 47 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 2 minutes, 2 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 10 minutes, 6 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 12 minutes, 16 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 15 minutes, 22 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 3 minutes, 37 seconds, CC, Subtitles
  • Videos, 3 minutes, 41 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 7 hours, 13 minutes, 34 seconds
  • Videos, 6 minutes, 35 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 6 minutes, 22 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 4 minutes, 3 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 3 minutes, 15 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 5 minutes, 8 seconds, CC, Subtitles
  • Videos, 2 minutes, 29 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 32 minutes, 39 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 7 minutes, 8 seconds, CC
  • Videos, 10 minutes, 23 seconds, CC, Subtitles

Regional Focus

Global, North America, United States, USA - Northeast, Maine

Format

Google Docs, Google Slides, PDF, YouTube Video

Nature Observing for Climate Change Module

|
Ask a Question

Synopsis
  • In this multi-unit module, students will learn how to keep a nature observation journal that will be beneficial for climate science investigations.
  • This module incorporates skills such as measurement and estimation, making inferences, drawing diagrams, collecting data, and understanding the difference between facts and opinions to help students create a journal that could be useful for future climate scientists.
Teaching Tips

Positives

  • This lesson does a great job of identifying unknown words and defining them for students prior to seeing them in context.
  • This is a great lesson for students who may be anxious with the weight of being responsible for making a difference in climate change and gives students something they can do to contribute every day when they are feeling overwhelmed.

Additional Prerequisites

  • Some students, including English language learners, may need the terms observation, data, scientist, climate, botany, compact, metadata, context, and possibly other terms defined prior to starting the lesson.
  • Students should have a basic understanding of the causes of climate change and what climate change is.
  • Clicking on the video on slide 6 of the Skills You Need: Measuring slide deck will not play the video, however, the link for slide 5 on the References slide will take you to the video (the slide 6 link is a different video).
  • It may be beneficial for students to have explicitly practiced making inferences prior to doing this lesson.
  • Students should understand how to measure objects to the nearest centimeter or inch.

Differentiation

  • Most of the information presented in this lesson is done so through slides. Students have the option to read the slides or have them read to them.
  • After watching the Audubon videos, students can discuss the effect that climate change has on bird habitats and populations, then research the effects and create a public service announcement.
  • Students can discuss how one person can make a difference for the environment and brainstorm ways they can make a difference for the environment.
  • Students can discuss how to record their location, the difference between relative and absolute location, latitude and longitude, and the best method of recording the locations in their journals.
  • Language arts classes could practice letter formatting with the letter to a climate scientist activity, giving students an authentic purpose for their writing.
  • History classes can discuss the lasting impacts that figures in history mentioned in the lesson have had and can discuss why their contributions are still relevant today.
Scientist Notes
This module discusses how to take scientific observations, why observations are helpful, and how to create an observation journal. The module steps students through some notable nature observers, the different things they recorded, and why having observations over a long period of time is important. Students are also walked through different skills they need to make their own journals. This lesson is a great introduction to what types of data are useful for scientists, how scientists record their observations, and how much data is collected for climate observations. The lesson also helps students to start thinking, observing, and describing their surroundings in a scientific way. The information presented is accurate and this resource is recommended for teaching.
Standards
  • Mathematics
    • Statistical Reasoning: Measurement and Data (K-5)
      • 3.MD.B.4 Generate measurement data by measuring lengths of objects using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch. Record and show the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units—whole numbers, halves, or fourths.
      • 4.MD.A.1 Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table.
  • Science and Engineering
    • ESS3: Earth and Human Activity
      • 4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.
  • English Language Arts
    • Reading (K-12)
      • R.3.6 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
      • R.3.12 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
      • R.4.6 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
      • R.4.12 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
      • R.5.12 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
    • Writing (K-12)
      • W.3.3 Routinely produce a variety of clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose.
      • W.4.3 Routinely produce a variety of clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose.
      • W.5.3 Routinely produce a variety of clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose.
  • Social Studies
    • Geography
      • Geography 1: Students understand the geography of the community, Maine, the United States, and various regions of the world by communicating their findings by creating visual representations of the world, showing a basic understanding of the geographic grid, including the equator and prime meridian.
    • History
      • History 1: Students understand various major eras in the history of the community, Maine, and the United States by identifying major historical eras, major enduring themes, turning points, events, consequences, persons, and timeframes, in the history of the community, the state, and the United States. Students make real or simulated decisions related to the state of Maine or civic organizations by applying appropriate and relevant social studies knowledge and skills, including research skills, and other relevant information. Students distinguish between facts and opinions/interpretations in sources.
  • Related Resources

    Reviews

    Login to leave a review